• LAYING IT ON THE LINE

    That’s how I felt when I competed.

    That’s how I feel x10 when we host a competition.
    We hosted through a 3rd party a couple years ago and I thought to myself “we could eventually run one of these.”

    Last Hallowe’en came around and I thought it would be fun to run a competition where everyone competes in costume.
    Just yesterday we ran the second annual Compete in Costume.

    The week of:
    Have I done everything I need to? Is the schedule going to run smoothly? Do I have enough volunteers? Do I have more than enough volunteers, because there’s always stuff that comes up. Have I sent out all the necessary info? What could possibly happen that I’m not taking into account right now?

    The night before:
    High alert. As soon as we finish the classes I’m on overdrive. Lace and I are running around doing all the finishing touches and she can hardly keep up. Patience is low (sorry), and everything needs to be right. I don’t really sleep too much. I dream about the competition. I wake up often. It feels sort of like the night before a playoff game back when I played football.

    The morning of:
    Oddly I wake up very calm. Probably because the lead up has been so meticulous.

    Competition Day.
    Mind and body are ON for as long as it takes. It’s hard to describe, but I’m more exhausted after hosting than I ever was after a full day of competing. When I got home yesterday I slept for 2 hours.
    I may look calm, but in my mind is going a mile a minute trying to make sure we’re on time, everything is in place and ready to go for the next heat or event, the athletes are enjoying themselves, and my team is taken care of and know what they have to do next.

    The Aftermath:
    Did it run well? Were people happy? Did they like the programming? Did the fittest people really get a chance to express that?
    I’ve spent a lot of time competing myself, and every now and then it will still come up in conversation “this was the stupidest event I’ve ever done in competition” or “this competition had pretty poor judging” or “during this competition something happened that the organizers didn’t foresee that totally changed the outcome”

    I don’t want our competitions to ever come up in those conversations. But really, sometimes it’s not even in your control.

    I guess time will tell. Social media is a good indicator. Are people excited with what went down? Are they looking forward to the next time THEY can lay it on the line?

    The day is stressful, but it’s always been worth it.
    I’ve been fortunate to have so many great memories competing, and this is a way to pay it forward.

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